Tag Archives: Thought Leader

5 Tips to Build Trust Using Content Marketing

1 Dec

Young business woman writing trust building concept. Isolated on white.

There’s no doubt about it: in today’s ultra-connected online community, public communication about customer experience travels fast. Whether good or bad, you can be certain that your business will be the subject of a Yelp or Google Business review at some point in its future.

While the thought of being the subject of a negative Yelp review can make some business owners lose sleep at night, your business’s online content can be leveraged to your advantage if it’s managed correctly.

When a business builds up a decent collection of positive reviews, it seems more reliable to prospective customers based on its positive reputation of credibility and trust in the community. In much the same way, content marketing operates on a similar level of established trust and reliability.

Thought Leaders Generate Trust in their Communities

When you use content marketing to your advantage, you become a subject matter expert in your niche. If the information you publish is reliable, consistent, and compelling to your audience, you’ll benefit from shares, likes, page views, and comments. In today’s social media-dependent marketplace, this type of connectivity helps to establish a high level of trust in your organization.

Consider the following tips when looking to establish a reliable flow of communication and authority in your industry:

1. Become a subject matter expert and a thought leader in your industry.

Focus on delivering hyper-relevant content in your specific niche so your customer base looks to you as an authority. Eventually, you want other businesses in your industry to consider you a thought leader as well, which can generate cross posting across industry experts and greatly improve the visibility of your business. This powerful combination enhances your credibility and boosts your audience’s trust in your brand.

2. Establish your brand voice and tone—and stick with it.

In order to nurture a long-term connection with your audience, you’ll want to infuse your content with a consistent voice and tone. Make sure your content writers have reliable guidelines to present information that is in line with your brand and reflective of your corporate persona.

3. Focus on influencers and connect with them regularly.

When industry experts share your posts and link to your products and pages, your business instantly becomes more credible to a wider audience.

4. Tap into your employees as solution-providers and brand ambassadors.

When you create empathy between your employees and your customers, you establish the foundation for trust. Your customers are human beings looking for a solution to a problem, and as such, they are seeking a connection with someone they can relate to on the other side of the transaction.

When your customers bond with your employees via social media posts and other communication methods, it establishes a relationship with your brand that transcends the cold disconnect that often pervades today’s automated business transactions.

5. Prioritize consistent content delivery.

When it comes to building your business’s reputation as a thought leader in your community, focus on delivering compelling, useful information on a regular basis. Not only does this prevent your website and blog from appearing outdated and stale, it lets your customer base know that you are on top of the latest industry innovations and techniques that present your business as the solution they need.

We’ve all heard the phrase about doing business with people you know, like, and trust. Try to be consistent in your use of these five tips to build that trust. You’re on your own in getting people to like you.

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Don’t Let Words Overpower the Message

21 Jan

Avoid These Marketing Buzzwords in 2016

Buzzwords

When I was at the B2B Marketing Forum this past year, we played a little game called “marketing bingo.” Some of you might be familiar with it. You play by creating a card of marketing lingo, slang, and overused words, and then you work to fill up your board as you hear these words used throughout the conference. And you’d be amazed to learn how quickly those bingo cards fill up.

Towards the end of last year, I wrote a blog post about how marketers need to focus on being classic rather than trendy. Reports show that as marketers are trying more and more to push the envelope to keep up with the latest trends, they’re missing some of the fundamentals of marketing. I believe that a lot of the time, marketers are too focused on who can throw out the most marketing buzzwords in a conversation rather than having a substantive discussion of the deeper issues at hand.

That’s why I was so excited to come across an article from Marketo last week discussing some of the top buzzwords that marketers should retire this year. I’ve picked out a few of my favorites:

  • Email Blast: A shotgun blasts, an email doesn’t. If anything, as marketers we should be looking for more and more ways to personalize our emails—not “blast” them out to the largest group possible.
  • Low Hanging Fruit: Aiming low is always a great way to get results, right? No. If you’re looking for low-hanging fruit, I can almost guarantee that you already have it—and it’s rotten.
  • Thought Leader: This one is tricky, because I use it myself. But the reason for not using it is strong—essentially, any content you produce should come from a place of leadership. Too often, though, this word comes from a promotional place. Aim to help, not sell.

As marketers, it’s easy to get caught up in whatever the latest buzzword is. And it’s not inherently bad to be aware of the concepts, but it is if it comes at the expense of actual deeper thinking. Don’t let the words overpower the message and don’t let fleeting trends override long-term strategy.

If you want to see the full list of marketing buzzwords to avoid in 2016, read the article.

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