Tag Archives: Technology

3 Tips for Using Video to Market Building Materials

21 Jul

Film Industry

Video can be a highly effective element in your digital marketing efforts. Why try to tell your customers about your building products when you can show them? Technology is also driving the trend in video. With more and more customers accessing the web through mobile, video has become increasingly important.

To get the best results, keep these video marketing tips in mind:

  1. Choose the right length for the medium and the customer.
    Videos that are too short may not provide enough information. When videos are too long, there is a risk of prospects getting bored and navigating away before they are finished. Videos intended for prospects new to your brand should be short. Experts say that videos for Facebook should be two to three minutes. On YouTube, you can gain traction with videos anywhere from one to five minutes in length. To reach customers further down the sales funnel, try in-depth videos that thoroughly explain the value and applications of your products
  2. Get to the action quickly.
    You only have seconds to gain prospects’ interest. Instead of starting with a long introduction, consider jumping straight into the action. Begin with an arresting visual or a surprising fact about your product. By drawing people in quickly, you get the chance to keep them watching and convince them to check out your brand.
  3. Use a mix of video types.
    How-to and explainer videos can show your customers how your products perform in the real world. Testimonial videos allow your prospects to hear for themselves what your happy customers have to say about your products and services. Product showcase videos allow your customers to get a better look at what you are offering than they can get with still photos and text descriptions. By including a range of types of content, you can give prospects more of the information that they are looking for.

Video gives you a chance to connect with busy professionals who don’t have the time to read marketing materials or who prefer to get information in an audio/visual format. By adding this type of content to your marketing mix, you can reach a wider array of prospects and show them just how your products can work for them.

Share via email

Learn Something New from These B2B Marketing Accounts

15 Mar

Follow on Twitter

Your B2B Crash Course Is Just a Follow Away

Guest Contributor:
Jenee Meyer, Office Administrator

After 15 years building my career in advertising and account service, I took 14 years off to be a stay-at-home mom. Needless to say, my focus changed dramatically. Snacks and play dates became much more important to me than Facebook, Twitter, search engine optimization, and blogs.

Now I’m back in the advertising world as an office administrator at ER Marketing, and it can sometimes be scary teaching myself new things. But in marketing—and especially in ever-changing industries like building—it’s important to always strive to learn and try new things.

While I was a stay-at-home mom, I took my daughter and son to a Google® event called CoderDojo. The kids would sit at long tables and the mentors would write a few words on the whiteboard stating what the goal was for the day. Maybe it was creating a weather page or maybe it was making a simple game. The beginners had some on-line lessons they could work through to get started while the more advanced kids just started working on their projects, asking questions of mentors when they were needed. At the end of three hours, two or three kids would come up to the front and show what they had created.

No elaborate instructions were given. No one was “taught” anything by listening to an instructor standing up front. It was up to kids who were 10+ years old to figure out how they were going to create something. It was amazing to watch how kids aren’t afraid to teach themselves new skills. So why, as adults, are we often afraid to learn new skills ourselves? More importantly—what can we do to learn them?

For me, I’ve turned to content: blogs, tweets, whitepapers, studies—anything I can get my hands on. Admittedly, the amount of content there is on the web can be intimidating. It can feel like everyone is talking and no one is listening. If I want to listen, how do I find the blogs and posts that will nurture my career and mind vs. ones that will leave me feeling like I’ve eaten too much candy? It’s a conundrum.

Here are a few of the Twitter accounts I’ve followed that help teach me new things and give me the B2B marketing information I need to get back in the game:

  • @ERMarketing, @EltonMayfield, @RenaeGonner: Okay, so it’s a bit of a shameless plug, but the founders of ER Marketing, Elton and Renae, are all over this stuff. Their accounts are focused on B2B marketing, with a slant towards the building products industry—but the insights are applicable for any industry.
  • @MarketingB2B: Not only does this account keep you up-to-date with helpful articles and trends, it also tweets helpful news roundups of the latest in B2B marketing.
  • @B2Community: Business 2 Community is all content, all the time. They have an open community of contributors, meaning that you’re getting insights collected from people across industries, careers, and experiences.
  • @MarketingProfs: Run by Ann Handley of Marketing Profs, this account is all about content. What I like about it is that it doesn’t just grab any random article—it’s carefully curated so no matter what you click, you get good, useful content.
  • @CMIContent: This account is great because it gives you a breadth of topics—everything from social media to search engine marketing to paid search. For someone like me, trying to jump in and give myself a crash course on what’s current in the marketing game, it’s very helpful.

Whether you’re new to B2B marketing, trying to jump back in, or just trying to stay current on the latest industry trends, it’s important to remind yourself that there is no right or wrong way to go about this. Just start following blogs and Twitter accounts, and if something isn’t working for you, you can always unsubscribe or unfollow with a simple click.

After taking 14 years to raise my family, I’m back in—and my game plan is to follow more people on Twitter and subscribe to more blogs. But most importantly, I’m going to actually take time to read those tweets and blogs. I can subscribe to everything in the world, but if I’m not reading it, it does me no good.

That’s my game plan. What’s yours?

 

Share via email

Don’t Let Words Overpower the Message

21 Jan

Avoid These Marketing Buzzwords in 2016

Buzzwords

When I was at the B2B Marketing Forum this past year, we played a little game called “marketing bingo.” Some of you might be familiar with it. You play by creating a card of marketing lingo, slang, and overused words, and then you work to fill up your board as you hear these words used throughout the conference. And you’d be amazed to learn how quickly those bingo cards fill up.

Towards the end of last year, I wrote a blog post about how marketers need to focus on being classic rather than trendy. Reports show that as marketers are trying more and more to push the envelope to keep up with the latest trends, they’re missing some of the fundamentals of marketing. I believe that a lot of the time, marketers are too focused on who can throw out the most marketing buzzwords in a conversation rather than having a substantive discussion of the deeper issues at hand.

That’s why I was so excited to come across an article from Marketo last week discussing some of the top buzzwords that marketers should retire this year. I’ve picked out a few of my favorites:

  • Email Blast: A shotgun blasts, an email doesn’t. If anything, as marketers we should be looking for more and more ways to personalize our emails—not “blast” them out to the largest group possible.
  • Low Hanging Fruit: Aiming low is always a great way to get results, right? No. If you’re looking for low-hanging fruit, I can almost guarantee that you already have it—and it’s rotten.
  • Thought Leader: This one is tricky, because I use it myself. But the reason for not using it is strong—essentially, any content you produce should come from a place of leadership. Too often, though, this word comes from a promotional place. Aim to help, not sell.

As marketers, it’s easy to get caught up in whatever the latest buzzword is. And it’s not inherently bad to be aware of the concepts, but it is if it comes at the expense of actual deeper thinking. Don’t let the words overpower the message and don’t let fleeting trends override long-term strategy.

If you want to see the full list of marketing buzzwords to avoid in 2016, read the article.

Share via email

B2B Email: Only As Good As the Inbox It Lands In

16 Jul

Simple Tips for Email Deliverability

iPad Finger ThinkstockPhotos-178480834

You’ve done the unthinkable: you’ve crafted the perfect marketing email. A stunning design, perfect CTA, and breathtakingly relevant content.

And guess what? None of it matters if it doesn’t land in an inbox. Email deliverability is one of the most important things to keep in mind as you engage with your audience. And yet, it seems like it’s often overlooked. This article from Marketing Profs talks about the importance of email deliverability and a few tips on how to improve it. Here are a few of the best tips from the article:

  • Personalize Your Emails: The more personalized your emails are, the more likely your audience is to engage with it. This will produce a more positive sender reputation with ISPs, who can make or break sender reputations. This should be a “gimme.” In fact, we’ve recently discussed the importance of producing personalized content based both on Buyer Personas (who your audience is) and the Buyer Journey (where they are in their sales journey). But according to this article, even simple customizations like variable first names and region-specific modifications make a big difference. There is even evidence that some users will sacrifice online privacy for personalization—in other words, they’re giving up one of their most precious online commodities simply to guarantee that the emails that land in their inbox are actually relevant to them.
  • Optimize Email for Mobile: Sorry, B2B marketers—this applies to you just as much as anyone else. Mobile open rates are growing for B2C and B2B industries alike, and B2B marketers will need to adapt their email code accordingly. Shockingly, only one-third of content publishers say their emails are mobile-optimized. This is unacceptable; since emails are usually opened once, marketers have one chance to make a first impression, and that means creating a content environment that the audience wants to participate in. So maybe it’s not just about personalizing based on where your audience is in their Buyer Journey—it’s about personalizing based on where they are literally reading the content. Don’t let your email deliverability suffer because you’re not willing to optimize for mobile.

These are just a couple of the tips from the article. For the full list of email deliverability best practices, read it by clicking here.

Share via email

Sales Enablement: You’re Up and Then You’re Down

9 Apr

High Prioritization of Sales Enablement vs. Low Prioritization of Sales Technology

SALESGRAPH_iStock_000000189717Medium

I’ve spoken before about how sales enablement will be a key component of many companies’ B2B marketing plans going forward. (See these articles for more: 1 and 2.) When executed with careful strategy, innovative solutions, and a keen ear to the needs of the sales team and their customers, it can be a powerful tool—and, as a recent article from Hubspot points out—a powerful productivity booster.

The article references the 2014 MHI Research Institute Sales Performance and Productivity Study which states that there are two main priorities for sales teams that are overwhelmingly agreed upon:

  1. Knowledge Transfer: Improving product knowledge and market competitive intelligence.
  2. Behavioral Change: Improving process, skills, or competency training.

As marketers, where do we fit into this equation? It’s simple: we make sure these two priorities don’t act as ships passing in the night. We bridge the two. Quoted in the article, Tamara Schenk, research director at Miller Heiman explained it simply: “These services have to be connected to create value instead of noise. Providing content alone is not enabling the sales force.”

Here’s the challenge: one of the best ways to do that is via powerful CRM and other marketing automation technologies that can help lead prospects down the sales funnel, creating marketing-qualified leads. Unfortunately, according to the survey, “the two least commonly planned productivity investments are deploying CRM systems and deploying new sales productivity applications,” and even less planned to spend money on sales productivity apps.

In other words, there’s a gap between what has been prioritized as important and what companies are willing to spend B2B marketing dollars on. The implication, then, is that if sales technology is prioritized so low and sales enablement is prioritized so high, B2B marketers have a challenge (and opportunity) to rely on strategy rather than technology.

For more insights from the article, give it a read here.

Share via email