Tag Archives: Customer Experience

Do B2B Industries Need to Worry About Social Media in 2017?

5 Sep

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In the United States, it is no longer socially acceptable for a viable business to consider email as a primary source of outreach. This is especially true in a niche industry such as building materials – make one person angry, and it could affect business with many partners. Countries outside of the United States are actually drawing the curtains on traditional outreach methods in a legal way. Canada and the EU define hard penalties for companies who are found to be in defiance of this new social norm.

With traditional outreach and mass platforms on the decline, at least for businesses, social outreach will certainly continue to experience growth in the near future. Social media has been identified as a core hub for big data and cost-effective trend analysis, even without the clamps being placed on other sources of outreach.

Do B2B industries need to worry about social media in 2017? The short answer is yes. Here are the specific reasons why:

Opportunities to Improve the Customer Experience

CX (the customer experience) is the new UI. CX is now the centerpiece of most successful social media initiatives from B2B companies. The best part – if you are highly focused on CX, you will be ahead of the curve, especially in the building materials industry.

Customers, especially large clients, love personalized service. They demand it. They are also looking for highly intuitive communications with you, even if that communication is knowingly automated. Your brand messaging must be consistent, especially if the customer is sitting at the beginning of the sales funnel.

If you have yet to solidify the connection between your major social media accounts, do so right away. Your landing page should move nicely into your Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. NOTE: If one of the major social media hubs does not work for your company for some reason, it is better to get rid of it completely rather than have a dead channel on your hands.

Investments in More Interactive Content

Modern marketing is more visual than ever, and most of these visuals are not as static or 2D as they used to be. More B2B companies are investing in interactive content than ever before. Content that reaches out and grabs the viewer obviously has a positive impact on engagement. The overall result is a heightened priority on indirect marketing vehicles such as livestreams, blogs and interactive product demos over webinars.

The overwhelming majority of customers enjoy interactive content at all levels of the sales funnel. However, interactive content can be expensive to produce, and its rollout is usually slower. You will need to focus on social media to find the best opportunities to employ strong visuals and interactivity. You can also focus your efforts on your best customers through social media, ensuring that your ROI for more expensive marketing remains high.

Qualifying Better Leads

Customers basically give away their souls on social media. If your CMO knows how to collect and interpret data, you will be able to screen for qualified customers more diligently than ever. Converting your social leads will only become more important as email and other mass forms of outreach become less effective.

The most successful companies in the next five years will understand intimately how social media marketing translates into new leads, legacy customers and the bottom line. Get ready for increased investments in social as time goes on.

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Book Review 3: The Fred Factor (Part 2/2)

12 May

4 Steps to Find and Develop “Freds” in Your Organization

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I recently wrote a blog post on Mark Sanborn’s book, The Fred Factor. While that post focused on explaining what a Fred is (long story short: a passionate employee who delivers an extraordinary customer/client experience) and how to identify one, this blog post will dig into how you can find and develop Freds within your own organization.
But first, why go to the effort? Quite simply, Freds—the most passionate people in your organization—are different. They do ordinary things extraordinarily well. Not surprisingly, Freds are also generally happier because people doing good work feel good, and people doing exceptional work feel, well, exceptional.

Sanborn uses the acronym FRED to explain how to develop “Freds”:

  • Find: There are three main avenues for finding Freds within and for your organization:
    1. Let Freds find you. If you really want your company to be world-class, it must become the kind of place that attracts Freds. To accomplish that, you must empower the Freds you have so their impact will be felt not only in the work your company does externally, but also in your internal culture.
    2. Discover “Dormant Freds.” There are many employees, also known as Dormant Freds, whose inner Fred has yet to blossom. To find them, watch for people that do things with flair (not to be confused with showing off or trying to attract attention)—an exceptionally well-done project, an elegant client meeting, or a clever suggestion are all possible tip-offs that a Dormant Fred is hiding in plain sight. Here are some questions to ask yourself about a potential Dormant Fred:
      • What do I remember about this person?
      • What’s the most extraordinary thing he or she has ever done?
      • How badly would this person be missed if he or she left his or her current position?
    3. Recruit and hire Freds. When you have exhausted your internal Fred pool, you may have to look externally to find them. Here are some great interview questions to find those prospective Freds:
      • Who are your heroes? Why?
      • Why would anyone do more than necessary?
      • Tell me three things that you think would delight most customers/clients/consumers.
      • What’s the coolest thing that has happened to you as a customer?
      • What is service?
  • Reward – Implement a rewards program to make sure Freds are recognized and appreciated, even if you are only recognizing good intentions and not a good final result. While nobody likes to fail, it is important to encourage employees to take chances. When people feel like their contributions are unappreciated, they will stop trying. And when that happens, innovation dies. My company, ER Marketing, recently implemented an award system in which employees nominate each other for exceptional work and attitude. This is meant to encourage employees who live up to the ER Marketing values of Curiosity, Respect, Accountability, and Performance (yes, we know what that acronym spells) with peer and management-level recognition.
  • Educate – Find examples of “Freds,” (both inside and outside of your organization), analyze those examples for commonalities that others can learn from, teach others to act extraordinary everyday—not just when there is a crisis—and set an example (invite others to act similarly).
  • Demonstrate – Set an example by inspiring, involving, initiating, and improvising. Here are some ways you can set an example and inspire employees to better serve your customers, vendors, and fellow employees better:
    • Inspire, but don’t intimidate.
    • Involve by creating a “Team Fred” of leaders in your organization.
    • Don’t wait for the “right” moment. It will never come—you have to make it.

One final, important thought from the book: Pull, Don’t Push. You can’t command someone to be a Fred. You can’t require someone to practice the Fred Factor. Command-and-control short-circuits the spirit of the Fred Factor, which is about opportunity, not obligation.

Invite people to join you. The most powerful tool you have to spread the Fred Factor throughout your organization is your own behavior—the example of your life and the effect it has on others. The best “Freducators” are themselves Freds. As John Maxwell says, “You teach what you know, you reproduce who you are.”

 

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