Tag Archives: building product industry

3 Tips for Using Video to Market Building Materials

21 Jul

Film Industry

Video can be a highly effective element in your digital marketing efforts. Why try to tell your customers about your building products when you can show them? Technology is also driving the trend in video. With more and more customers accessing the web through mobile, video has become increasingly important.

To get the best results, keep these video marketing tips in mind:

  1. Choose the right length for the medium and the customer.
    Videos that are too short may not provide enough information. When videos are too long, there is a risk of prospects getting bored and navigating away before they are finished. Videos intended for prospects new to your brand should be short. Experts say that videos for Facebook should be two to three minutes. On YouTube, you can gain traction with videos anywhere from one to five minutes in length. To reach customers further down the sales funnel, try in-depth videos that thoroughly explain the value and applications of your products
  2. Get to the action quickly.
    You only have seconds to gain prospects’ interest. Instead of starting with a long introduction, consider jumping straight into the action. Begin with an arresting visual or a surprising fact about your product. By drawing people in quickly, you get the chance to keep them watching and convince them to check out your brand.
  3. Use a mix of video types.
    How-to and explainer videos can show your customers how your products perform in the real world. Testimonial videos allow your prospects to hear for themselves what your happy customers have to say about your products and services. Product showcase videos allow your customers to get a better look at what you are offering than they can get with still photos and text descriptions. By including a range of types of content, you can give prospects more of the information that they are looking for.

Video gives you a chance to connect with busy professionals who don’t have the time to read marketing materials or who prefer to get information in an audio/visual format. By adding this type of content to your marketing mix, you can reach a wider array of prospects and show them just how your products can work for them.

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Is There More Opportunity for Green Builders in 2016?

19 Jul

HouseLawnPlan

The number of contractors involved in more than 60% of green products is growing and is set to grow to 31% both inside and out of the United States, according to a study by Dodge Data and Analytics. The largest green growth is occurring in First World and emerging economies around the world, such as the US, Brazil, South Africa, Germany, and Saudi Arabia. The rate of green building in the US, the UK, and Germany—even in the wake of Brexit—is expected to double by 2018.
The opportunity for green builders in the near future seems inevitable, but is there a way for a new construction product manufacturer to find his way into the market in 2016?
The answer lies in understanding the drivers for green building and positioning your company to take advantage of the developments.
Contractors who do business with government are at an advantage, especially in the United States and a few other Western countries. The US and Germany both have set a priority to expand new initiatives into other countries. Approximately 21 percent of contractors that are currently in the US now report that more than 60% of their contracted projects are green.
Some of the drivers for green building include new environmental regulations around the world, a market demand for sustainable energy construction, and individual client demand for green construction within certain industries. Part of the reason that green building is accelerating more quickly in the US than in the rest of the world is the client demand in the country. Clients in countries that are not the US are much more concerned with market demands, a great deal of which is keeping up with the money that the US spends on green construction.
Contractors outside of the US are more concerned with the impact of building sustainable energy buildings on the health of the actual occupants of that building. Basically, if you are trying to build inside of the US, your investors will want to know if you can reduce water and energy costs. Outside of the US, you should present how you will protect natural resources in the surrounding environment.
Overall, the US is trying to stay ahead of the world in the new green economy, and global competition is increasing because of the value inherent in green building. Depending on the contract that you are trying to get, focus on the needs of the partner organizations and clients in order to take advantage of the new, wide open green market. If you are selling to contractors inside of the US, make sure they know your products can help with energy costs—sell yourself as the supply-side cost reduction expert. Outside of the US, you might be able to get a leg up by featuring the ways in which your products will eventually help the people who will live and work in the buildings that will be created.

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Palate Cleanser: Why Building Products Marketing Matters

24 Nov

Now More Than Ever, Marketing Still Matters to the Bottom Line

Bruce Case

Those of us who have been in the building products industry for many years know that when times get tough, marketing can be one of the first things to get cut. The simple, undeniable truth is that B2B marketing is often underrated, and sometimes under-appreciated—but still effective and important to sales strategy in 2016 and beyond.

I recently came across a video from the 2015 Remodeling Leadership Summit and Big50 Awards ceremony, in which Bruce Case, the President/CEO of Case Remodeling, discusses the importance of marketing to his business. It’s a simple little palate cleanser, but worth watching. Here are a few quotes I pulled if you don’t have time to watch the whole thing:

“The marketing plan is the lifeblood of the business…[yet] a lot of people are tempted to cut that expense. But then that begins the ‘death spiral’ because the calls stop. In today’s world of social and digital marketing, you can do it in creative and less expensive ways.”

  • On the importance of marketing.

“What we’re really trying to do is drive people to our website, use the website, get people educated, and then get them come to us.”

“We need to look to where we’re going to be in five years. With Houzz and Porch, things are going to be vastly different in five years. And it’s trying to figure out how we’re going to be in the wave, not in front of the wave so the wave crashes over. Look at other industries. Taxis were bowled over by Uber in a short time.”

  • On why the building industry needs to always look ahead and innovate. As marketers, we will get pushback on this, but he’s right—it’s not enough for us to address current challenges; we have to be that much smarter and look ahead to tomorrow’s challenges as well. Sounds exhausting, doesn’t it?

Those were just a few of my favorite quotes from the video, but check out the whole clip here. (Don’t worry—it’s only about two minutes.)

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2015’s Top 10 Building Product Dealers and Lumberyards to Follow on Twitter (Part 2/2)

2 Oct

Prepare to Click Follow—Even More

iPad Finger Follow

Increasingly, building products marketers are taking advantage of social media to promote their business, products, and services—and with good reason. After all, the building products industry is still about people, and as generational dynamics continue to shift, social media provides a simple and affordable method to communicate directly with the people that make up your audience.

Throughout the past year, I’ve noticed a significant increase in the number of dealers adopting social media to communicate with their own audience in their own timeframe. Even better, I’ve noticed some lumberyards using social media really well. Last week, I rounded up five of the top dealers to follow on Twitter—and I promised to bring you five more. Here are #6-10 of 2015’s Top 10 Building Product Dealers to Follow:

  1. 84 Lumber Company (@84lumbernews): Looking for a one-stop shop for the most important housing/building industry news? Look no further than 84 Lumber Company. This account is great about scouring the web for relevant and informative articles that people in the building products industry need to know.
  2. Hingham Lumber (@hinghamlumber): Hingham is a bit of a grab bag of industry news, product factoids, and news, but one thing they’re good about is using Twitter to push their promotions, classes, and special events.
  3. Schutte Lumber Co (@schuttlumberco): DIY is big right now—the rise of Pinterest is a testament to that fact. But Schutte Lumber has managed to utilize Twitter well to provide DIY tips to more industrious customers. Besides that, they also smartly utilize Twitter as a platform to push their blog content.
  4. Economy Lumber (@economylumber): Economy is consistent about tweeting inspirational home ideas, DIY articles, wood-working tips, Houzz favorites, and general project ideas. Plus, they have an excellent blog that posts on the 1st and 15th of every month, and they tweet out links to these posts to keep their followers in the know.
  5. Midtown Lumber (@midtownlumber): With only 315 followers, we might classify this as “one to watch,” but they’re already doing plenty right. Not only do they post the DIY tips, product information, and other standard fare that one would expect from a lumberyard, but they are excellent about reaching out and using Twitter as a way to have conversations with others in the industry. Midtown seems to have already learned an important lesson: social media shouldn’t be a one-way communication.

That wraps up this year’s Top 10 Building Product Dealers to Follow on Twitter. If you’re looking for even more Twitter accounts to follow, look at our previous lists here and here.

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Not Ready to Speak? Try Listening.

25 Aug

With Building Products Social Media Marketing, Start by Listening

Stock Photo for Blog 8:24

I hear constantly from building product marketers that social media doesn’t apply to their business—that it’s “a B2C thing” or that it’s “for Millennials” and has no use when it comes to generating marketing qualified leads and closing sales. But when someone says this, what they’re really telling me is they’re not ready to use social as a platform to talk. My suggestion is this: if you’re hesitant about incorporating social media into your marketing plan, start instead with listening.

Quick story. I was at a trade show two years ago when a UPS delivery truck left behind a package containing my client’s pop-up booth. While an account coordinator at my agency tried frantically to get through to someone to talk to on the phone, I tweeted at UPS for help.

In the time the UPS social team responded to me, contacted the nearest store manager, and had the truck re-route to come and pick up the package, the account coordinator still hadn’t even reached an actual person on the phone.

These are the kinds of opportunities companies miss when they don’t at least listen to what’s happening in the social space. But there are many more benefits to social listening beyond just customer service. A recent article I read outlined a few that GE Lifesciences experienced when they began using social listening tools to monitor their industry:

  • Understanding language and terminology prospects were using
  • Learning the topics their audience was most interested in and creating content based on this information
  • Creating keyword search repositories for SEO and website taxonomy

Not every building products company is ready for a full social media marketing plan. I get it. 68% of CMOs openly admit their companies aren’t ready to fully incorporate social media into their strategies. But just because you’re not ready to use social as a platform to market your products doesn’t give you a free pass when it comes to listening to what your audience is saying.

At its heart, the building products industry is still about people. And as generational dynamics shift (hint: they’re already shifting), you can bet that those people are going to be on social media. One day social media won’t be optional—start listening now so that when that day comes, your company is prepared to speak.

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